Premier Dance Floor Systems by Robbins

The most advanced professional sprung dance floor systems are designed specifically for performers with dancer input to create the world’s most comfortable and highest performance surfaces.

 

Wood Sprung Floors

05-edgepac-studio-214x143

Robbins Wood sprung floors have a specially profiled hardwood performance surface that is recoatable & refinishable, & custom designed to increase flexibility and resilience for dancer safety.

 

Marley Sprung Floors

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Robbins Marley Vinyl Sprung Floors have a heavy duty, homogenous vinyl performance surface that is slip resistant, non-reflective, & dimensionally stable, and can be used in a wide variety of dance applications.

Click to visit Robbins Dance Floors Website

 

Installation Guide for Springflex Hardwood Dance Floor Systems

Before you begin installing your Springflex floor, read the instructions from start to finish. If you have any questions, contact Huggins at 908-232-6600 These instructions can be printed directly from your web browser.

Section A: Tools & Materials List:

What you will receive from us:

  • Bundles of wood flooring
  • Foam underlayment
  • Installation clips
  • Header joint adhesive

Tools you will need:

  • Hammer (non-rubber)
  • Saw
  • Chalk-line
  • Duct tape
  • Wall spacers
  • Crow bar
  • Tapping block
  • Pull tool
  • Broom
  • Poly Vapor underlayment  (if installing over concrete)

Section B: Pre-Installation Site Inspection:

1. Subfloor Moisture Testing of Concrete
Springflex can be installed in rooms with normal humidity levels on sub-floors that are firm, level, and dry. To determine if a concrete subfloor is dry, several methods can be used:

Method A: Place a sheet of plastic film on the surface of the subfloor and seal the edges with duct tape. If, after 24 hours, condensation or darkening does occur, refer to Method B.
sprung floor test concrete with plastic

Method B: Should method A exceed tolerance, a 72 hour calcium-chloride test needs to be conducted on the concrete subfloor (ASTM F-1869). For emission levels of up to 6lbs. of pressure, use Polyfelt with fully taped seams. For levels up to 10lbs., use 6mil. plastic underneath as a secondary moisture barrier with fully duct-taped seams. For readings in excess of 10lbs., corrective measures must be taken in order to successfully install Springflex. See section E. figure 1 for additional information on Secondary Vapor Barrier.sprung floor moisture test vapor barrier

Section C: Preparing For Installation

1. Subfloor Tolerance:
Subfloors can be any firm surface such as concrete, plywood, sheet vinyl, or smooth tiles, etc. Surface variation should not exceed 3/16″ within a ten-foot radius. To Determine flatness of the subfloor, use the edge of the Springflex flooring board. Correct minor low spots by filling with tar paper or roofing felt. Extensive low spots may require a levelling compound. Scrape, sand, or grind any high areas.
sprung floor install tolerance test
2. Clean the Subfloor
Scrape subfloor clean and sweep up all debris from construction. Any debris left on the floor could compromise the secondary vapor barrier, in the event that subfloor moisture requires an additional layer of 6 mil. plastic.

3. Determine the Direction of Installation
sprung floor installation direction
Decide which direction your flooring will be installed. The rule of thumb is to run the length of the flooring with the length of the room. Other considerations are to install planks parallel to the incoming light source or parallel to the direction of traffic flow.

Section D: Expansion and Contraction Planning

1. Planning for Expansion
sprung floor install expansion planning
It is vital in the planning of the job layout that you understand the unique nature of the Springflex product. This is not a veneer product (plywood); it is solid wood throughout. Always allow for proper expansion space around the perimeter of the floor. the rule is 1/4″ expansion space for every 10 feet of width ON BOTH SIDES! The rule for expansion on the length is 1/8″ for every 10 feet of length on both ends.

2. Expansion Space — Doing the Math
To calculate the correct expansion space for width of floor use the following table:
Expansion Formula = 1/4″ per 10 foot span each side — 1/2″ per side minimum.
20 ft. span = 1/2″ expansion per side
30 ft. span = 3/4″ expansion per side
40 ft. span = 1″ expansion per side
50 ft. span = 1 1/4″ expansion per side

3. Preparing for Expansion Needs
sprung floor expansion needs planning
Remove any existing baseboard, molding or doorway thresholds. These items can be replaced after installation. Door casings should be undercut and notched out to avoid difficult scribe cuts and provide for proper expansion space. This is easily done by placing a flooring board on top of the Poly Plastic against the frame and sawing the door jamb. The flooring can then slide under the door frame.

Section E: Underlayments

1. Secondary Vapor Barrier
Should the preliminary moisture tests exceed specifications, an additional layer of 6 mil. plastic is required. Run plastic 4″ up wall and tape in place with 3M blue painter’s tape. Overlap plastic 8″ and tape seam with duct tape.Lay plastic in opposite direction of the first  layer of Poly Plastic to minimize where joints line up. Run line of duct tape on seam where plastic meets subfloor and at a surface seam after lapping seam 8 inches.
sprung floor installation rolling secondary vapor barrier
2. Installing Poly Plastic
Loose lay the Poly Plastic. Overlap the seam and seal the seam along its entire length with duct tape. Extend Poly Plastic 4″ up the wall and tape in place with 3M blue painter’s tape to hold it up and out of the way. This extra material will create the tuck necessary to guard against moisture invasion through the perimeter walls. Should the floor have a plastic membrane under the Poly Plastic, it should be tucked and trimmed as well (See G-4). Note: Make sure you trim your expansion cavity high enough to accommodate all the material that will be involved in the tuck.

sprung floor installation installing poly plastic

Section F: Pre-Installation Material Inspection

1. Inspect Material
Examine all material for any defects before installation. Should any defects be present, STOP THE JOB and contact your representative right away. Do not install any plank that is obviously defective. We strive to make a product that is second to none in quality. However, the time to correct a possible defect is before the material is installed.
sprung floor material inspection
2. Polyfilm Backer
Many Springflex products have a plastic film adhered to the back of the board. This is designed to balance the top with the bottom of the plank which makes a more dimensionally stable floor.
STOP! — Do not remove Polyfilm backer!

Section G: Installing Quick-Clip System

1. Starting Line
Choose a long straight wall as your starting wall To start your first row of boards, tack and stretch string 1/2″ away from wall, and 1/2″ above surface of the floor height. The string acts as a guide to help keep the boards in a straight line.
sprung floor quick clip starting line
2. Expansion Space
A minimum space of 1/2″ must be left along all perimeter walls and other vertical obstructions. Extra large rooms or wide runs of flooring will require larger expansion gaps. For runs wider than 20 feet see section D-2.
sprung floor installation expansion space
3. Tuck and Wrap
It is important to protect the edge of the floor from moisture invasion at exterior walls. Untape the Poly Plastic and secondary vapor barrier (if one was required). Take a scrap of flooring and gently push the under-layment into the cavity. Lay your row of flooring to where you want the edge to be according to your expansion needs.
sprung floor installation moisture protection
4. Cut Tuck Remnant
Cut off excess material from tuck-and-wrap process. Remember to check your clearance to insure floor can easily move in and out of expansion cavity. Make sure clearance is uniform around entire perimeter. A high area of the slab could result in a section of the floor not being able to move freely.
sprung floor installation check clearance
5. Irregular & Out-of-Square Walls
If your starting wall is irregular or out of square, scribe and cut the first row of boards to match variations. A simple scribe can be made by drilling a pencil-sized hole 1/2″ in from an expansion spacer. Use as shown in the illustration.
sprung floor installation for irregular and out of square walls
6. Starting Row
Begin in the left-hand corner with a full uncut plank. Lay the plank upside down and hammer the end of the clip with the holes into the clip groove (slot) on the underside of the plank. The long end of the clip without holes must project in the direction of the tongue.
sprung floor installation starting row
7. Clip Spacing
The distance between the clips should be about 18″ on center (four clips per six foot plank). The first and last clip at the end of each row must be 2″ to 4″ from the wall.
sprung floor installation clip spacing
8. Clip Planks Together
Glue and place the end joints together first; then use a hammer and tapping block against tongue to tap boards firmly together along the length. When the planks are tight, press down on the plank to engage the clip. To effectively seat the end joint, tap board into place starting at its open end and tapping back along its length into the floor. Note: Do not strike the edge of the board with the hammer or drive boards together too hard. This avoids damaging the edges of the board.
sprung floor clipping planks for installationsprung floor installation two boards joined together with clip
9. Glue the End Joint
Once the clips are in, turn the plank right side up and install the first board with the groove side towards the starting wall. The tongue side will be away from the wall with the long arm of the clip exposed. Apply Header Joint Adhesive to the inside bottom of the end joint groove (as shown) and repeat with succeeding boards to complete first row.
sprung floor installation glue end joint
10. Starting Next Row
To start the next row of boards, begin with the cut piece left over from the first row (if cut piece is under 16″, cut 16″ or more from a full plank to stagger the end joint). This end-gap spacing is critical to the structural integrity of the floor. Spacing end joints 16″ or more creates a proper interlocking strength for the floor. To prevent clips from touching each other, alternate them (in line) by approximately 2″ back and forth as you proceed across the floor.
sprung floor install starting next row stagger end
11. Clip Spacing at Corners
Clips need to be doubled up at places where the floor turns a corner or goes through a doorway. It is also important to narrow the clip spacing to 12″-14″ and place clips within 2″-4″ at ends when you go through a narrow aisle way. Using this method in narrow aisle ways will help prevent gaps from occurring.
sprung floor clip spacing at corners
12. End Joint Spacing
To create a random pattern, stagger end joints of boards by at least 16″and strip joints by at least 3″. The staggered pattern is critical to the structural integrity of the floor.
sprung floor installation random pattern offset
13. Fitting Last Row
Cut the last row of planks as needed to fit in the remaining space. Remember to allow for the expansion gap at the wall. If needed, the width of the last row of planks can be scribed with a pencil as pictured in section G, figure 5.

14. Installation of the Last Row
The final ripped down board must be glued to the preceding row by applying Header Joint Adhesive along its length (side). This is the only exception to applying Header Joint Adhesive to the length (side). Do not apply Header Joint Adhesive to the sides (length) of the boards anywhere else.
sprung floor installation installation of last row
15. Snugging Last Board
Cut the last board to proper length and use a crowbar to snug up the last board. Use a shim against the wall to avoid damage to the wall. Make sure all joints are tight and proper expansion space is left between all walls and completed floor.
sprung floor install last board
16. Radiator Pipes
If the room has pipes or radiators, drill a hole large enough to fit around them with space for expansion. Then saw diagonally away from holes (as shown). Fit board around pipe or feet of radiator and replace cut away piece.
sprung floor installation around radiator pipe
17. Securing Moldings
It is vitally important to secure moldings in a fashion that does not impede the ability of the floor to move. Transition moldings should never be fastened to the surface of the floor. The correct methods are to secure the transition molding to the subfloor by the use of nails, two-part epoxy, liquid nails, or construction adhesive and nails.
sprung floor installation securing molding

Section H: Molding, The Finishing Touch

Lip-Over Reducer:

For transition from flooring to existing floor.

sprung floor lip over reducer

Special Note:

Do not attach any transition moldings directly through the lip-over part of the molding. The transition molding is secured by the use of epoxy or liquid nails or fastened with a nail directly to the subfloor. This is critical since Springflex is a floating system and the movement of the floor is not to be impeded or restricted in any way.
sprung floor installation transition molding
Moulding Installation:

1. Drill Hole with 7/16″ masonry drill bit.
sprungfloorinstallationguide-h1
2. Insert Header Joint Adhesive into hole.
sprungfloorinstallationguide-h2
3. Tap 1/2″ wood dowel into hole.
sprungfloorinstallationguide-h3
4. Place two part epoxy, liquid nails, or urethane glue on concrete slab.
sprungfloorinstallationguide-h4
5. Press molding into adhesive.
sprungfloorinstallationguide-h5
6. Nail through molding into dowel.
sprungfloorinstallationguide-h6
Note: This method only applies to installation over concrete. For installation over wood subfloor follow instructions 4 through 6.

 

 

Sprung Floors

  • Central-School-of-Speech-and-Drama-216 Circus_space_Beech-1941-600r

(click to enlarge)

#500 Series Elite Springflex Hardwood Floor System

The most fantastic dance floor ever. Real solid hardwood flooring just like “Dancing With the Stars” floor.  Resilient for all dance, aerobic, gymnasium and sports. The unique, 100% free-floating construction of the hardwood dance floor with a cushioning suspension system enables it to be moved or reconfigured, protecting your investment and assuring future options. The factory applied multi coat polyurethane finish seals the hardwood for superior durability. This provides a hygienically safe traction coating which will not support the growth of bacteria or mildew and requires very little maintenance. This floor system is the easiest and fastest hardwood dance floor system to assemble. No nails are used and all clips are totally invisible when fitted to the back of the boards. Many owners install the floor themselves. The “Quick Clip” system was engineered to provide a simple yet effective method of installing Elite Springflex hardwood flooring over any solid level subfloor. This includes existing flooring such as concrete, clipboard, carpet, tile, sheet vinyl, ceramic or wood. Since the floor is completely prefinished, typical installations take less than two days with no fumes or odors to disrupt the operation of your facility. The floor is available for use immediately after the installation. Hardwood board width is 5″ tongue and groove, 7/8″ thick, 6′ length and weighs 3.2 lbs. per square foot. Color is Harmony Natural Beech. *Samples are available for $25.00 each. Sample cost is deductible from any Springflex Floor System order placed within 60 days from date on sample invoice.

NuFloor #500 Series Elite Springflex Hardwood Floor Systems, boards, clips and foam.
(specifications) (installation instructions)
STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
500-38 3/8 inch foam underlayment $14.95 s.f. $12.70 s.f.
500-12 1/2 inch foam underlayment $15.95 s.f. $13.55 s.f.
500-34 3/4 inch foam underlayment $17.50 s.f. $14.75 s.f.

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DIN Standards for Springflex Hardwood Dance Floor Systems

The Springflex Floor System is a high performance and low profile flooring system. The total finished floor thickness including the foam subfloor is only 1-1/8 inches to 1-3/4 inches in increased height depending on foam thickness. Springflex floors constructed with 3/8 inch foam and steel clips exceeds all world recognized DIN standards, providing excellent resilience, and high shock absorbency. The floor system has been successfully tested in accordance with the minimum requirements of DIN 18032, Part 2. Testing performed by the Otto Graf Institut. See DIN standard chart below as measured my Otto Graf Institut, Germany.

What are the DIN Standards?

The DIN standards were developed in Germany and are recognized worldwide as the best method for evaluating sports floors. The standards were developed to ensure that dance and aerobic athletes received the greatest degree of safety and performance from a flooring surface when participating in dance and aerobic exercise.

Certification Test Results for DIN standard 18032 Part II Test results as reported by Otto Graff Institut, Stuttgart, Germany

FLOOR TEST DIN STANDARD SPRINGFLEX FLOOR MEETS/EXCEEDS EXPLANATION
Shock Absorption Minimum 53% 54.20% X Insufficient shock absorption causes activity related injuries to ankle and knee joints. Correct shock absorption reduces fatigue and significantly lowers the risk of injury.
Resilience Minimum 2.3mm 2.52mm X Inadequate energy return in a floor causes sore ankles and a surface too “hard” for safe, strenuous activity.
Surface Friction Minimum 0.5
Maximum 0.7
0.5 X Rotating and pivoting motions create strain on joints without proper friction coefficients to minimize stress. On a friction scale of .1(ice) to .9(fly paper) .5-.7 is the DIN Standard. At .5 springflex is perfect, even providing for the demands of platform and other high impact routines.
Impact Isolation W500
Maximum 15%
W500
13.2%
X Without proper impact isolation, participants’ movements can interfere with each other, creating the possibility of injury. The standard allows for 15% deflection, 20″ from the point of impact. Springflex exceeds that by providing over 86% isolation at 20″.
Surface Stability Minimum 1500N 1500N X Proper foot stability is essential to reducing foot roll-over and other injuries to participants. This is a fundamental advantage of the Springflex floor system compared to vinyl surfaces.

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800-MultiflexDanceFloor-300
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#800 Multi-Flex Dance Floor

The new #800 Multi-Flex Dance Floor is the ideal solution for those who want a suspended floor with a vinyl surface. The floor installs quickly and easily. The 5 1/2 inch wide tongue and groove boards come with specially designed Evazote 50 foam strips already attached to the bottom. Simply glue the boards to each other and the subfloor is finished. When the boards are glued together they form a smooth, undetectable joint making a totally smooth, flat surface for your vinyl floor. And because the boards are glued instead of nailed or screwed, you won’t feel any nail/screw heads or holes through the vinyl. Now you can apply the vinyl floor covering of your choice, either permanent or temporary. The Multi-Flex Dance Floor provides progressive shock absorption yet withstands heavy loads. The design provides even suspension on all points on the floor. This means you won’t find hard or soft spots on this floor. It has been tested with 45,000 test loadings without loss of it’s elastic characteristics and the tongue/groove connection in the floor has been stressed 100,000 times without damage. In short, it’s designed to last. It passes the DIN 18032 Section 2 test for dance/sports floors and was approved by the Norwegian Building Research Institute. Because the finished height of the Multi-Flex Dance Floor is only 1 1/8 inches (not including the vinyl covering of your choice) it makes an excellent choice for refurbishing an existing building. Boards are 5 7/16″ wide tounge and groove, 1 1/8″ thick, 7′ long and weigh 3 lbs per sq. ft. *Samples are available for $25.00 each. Sample cost is deductible from any Springflex Floor System order placed within 60 days from date on sample invoice.

(installation instructions)
STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
800 Multi-Flex $10.45 s.f. $7.45 s.f.

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825-OakFlexDanceFloor-Cranston-300
(click to enlarge)

#825 Oak-Flex Dance Floor

The new #825 Oak-Flex Dance Floor is a fully suspended floor with an oak surface. The floor installs quickly and easily. The 5 7/16″ wide tongue and groove boards come with specially designed Evazote 50 foam strips already attached to the bottom. Simply glue the boards to each other and the floor is finished. When the boards are glued together they form a smooth, undetectable joint making a totaly smooth, flat surface to dance on. The Oak-Flex Dance Floor provides progressive shock absorption yet withstands heavy loads. The design provides even suspension on all points on the floor. This means you won’t find hard or soft spots on this floor. It has been tested with 45,000 test loadings without loss of it’s elastic characteristics and the tongue/groove connection in the floor has been stressed 100,000 times without damage. In short, it’s designed to last. It passes the DIN 18032 Section 2 test for dance/sports floors and was approved by the Norwegian Building Research Institute. Because the finished height of the Oak-Flex Dance Floor is only 1 1/8 inches it makes an excellent choice for refurbishing an existing building. The top surface of oak is 1/8″ thick. Boards are 5 7/16″ wide tounge and groove, 1 1/8″ thick, 7 feet long and weigh 2.3 lbs per sq. ft. *Samples are available for $25.00 each. Sample cost is deductible from any Springflex Floor System order placed within 60 days from date on sample invoice.

(installation instructions)
STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
825 Oak-Flex $11.20 s.f. $8.95 s.f.

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850-MapleFlexDanceFloor-gym-300
(click to enlarge)

#850 Maple-Flex Dance Floor

The new #850 Maple-Flex Dance Floor is a fully suspended floor with a maple surface. The floor installs quickly and easily. The 5 7/16″ wide tongue and groove boards come with specially designed Evazote 50 foam strips already attached to the bottom. Simply glue the boards to each other and the floor is finished. When the boards are glued together they form a smooth, undetectable joint making a totaly smooth, flat surface to dance on. The Maple-Flex Dance Floor provides progressive shock absorption yet withstands heavy loads. The design provides even suspension on all points on the floor. This means you won’t find hard or soft spots on this floor. It has been tested with 45,000 test loadings without loss of it’s elastic characteristics and the tongue/groove connection in the floor has been stressed 100,000 times without damage. In short, it’s designed to last. It passes the DIN 18032 Section 2 test for dance/sports floors and was approved by the Norwegian Building Research Institute. Because the finished height of the Maple-Flex Dance Floor is only 1 1/8 inches it makes an excellent choice for refurbishing an existing building. The top surface of maple is 1/8″ thick. Boards are 5 7/16″ wide tounge and groove, 1 1/8″ thick, 7 feet long and weigh 2.3 lbs per sq. ft. *Samples are available for $25.00 each. Sample cost is deductible from any Springflex Floor System order placed within 60 days from date on sample invoice.

(installation instructions)
STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
850 Maple-Flex $12.35 s.f. $9.95 s.f.

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DIN Standards for #800, #825, #850 Flex Dance Floor Systems

The Flex Floor System is a high performance and low profile flooring system. The total finished floor thickness is only 1-1/8 inches high. Flex floors exceed all world recognized DIN standards, providing excellent resilience, and high shock absorbency. The floor system has been successfully tested in accordance with the minimum requirements of DIN 18032, Part 2. Testing performed by the Norwegian Building Research Institut (NBI). See DIN standard chart below as measured by the Norwegian Building Research Institut (NBI).

What are the DIN Standards?

The DIN standards were developed in Germany and are recognized worldwide as the best method for evaluating sports floors. The standards were developed to ensure that dance and aerobic athletes received the greatest degree of safety and performance from a flooring surface when participating in dance and aerobic exercise.

Certification Test Results for DIN standard 18032 Part II Test results as reported by the Norwegian Building Research Institut (NBI)

FLOOR TEST DIN STANDARD #800, #825, #850 FLEX FLOORS MEETS/EXCEEDS EXPLANATION
Shock Absorption Minimum 53% 61.00% X Insufficient shock absorption causes activity related injuries to ankle and knee joints. Correct shock absorption reduces fatigue and significantly lowers the risk of injury.
Resilience Minimum 2.3mm 2.8mm X Inadequate energy return in a floor causes sore ankles and a surface too “hard” for safe, strenuous activity.
Surface Friction Minimum 0.5
Maximum 0.7
0.59 X Rotating and pivoting motions create strain on joints without proper friction coefficients to minimize stress. On a friction scale of .1(ice) to .9(fly paper) .5-.7 is the DIN Standard. At .59 flex is excellent, even providing for the demands of platform and other high impact routines. On the #800 Multi-Flex depends on top surface.
Impact Isolation W500
Maximum 15%
W500
14.2%
X Without proper impact isolation, participants’ movements can interfere with each other, creating the possibility of injury. The standard allows for 15% deflection, 20″ from the point of impact. Flex exceeds that.
Surface Stability Minimum 1500N 1500N X Proper foot stability is essential to reducing foot roll-over and other injuries to participants. This is a fundamental advantage of the Flex floor system compared to vinyl surfaces.

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Baseboard and Transition Moldings

 

Hardwood baseboard and lipover transition moldings for #500 Springflex dance floors.

sprung floor baseboard
Baseboard: 6’6″ long, 3 1/2” high, 3/4″ thick

STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
500-BB Beech Baseboard $84.24 ea., $12.96 l.f. $77.76 ea., $11.96 l.f.

sprung floor lipover transition
Lipover Transition: 6’6″ long, 1 1/8” high, 2 5/16” wide

STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
500-LOR Beech Lipover Transition $131.95 ea., $20.30 l.f. $96.00 ea., $14.77 l.f.

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Hardwood baseboard and lipover transition moldings for #825 Oak-Flex, #850 Maple-Flex, and #800 Multi-Flex dance floors.

sprung floor baseboard
Baseboard: 6’6″ long, 2 1/4″ high, 3/4″ thick

STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
825-BB Oak Baseboard $47.10 ea., $7.25 l.f. $42.25 ea., $6.50 l.f.
850-BB Maple Baseboard $47.10 ea., $7.25 l.f. $42.25 ea., $6.50 l.f.

sprung floor lipover transition
Lipover Transition: 6’6″ long, 1 1/8″ high, 2 3/8 wide

STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
825-LT Oak Lipover Transition $131.95 ea., $20.30 l.f. $96.00 ea., $14.77 l.f.
850-LT Maple Lipover Transition $131.95 ea., $20.30 l.f. $96.00 ea., $14.77 l.f.

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Vent Cove Base

spring flooring vent cove base
Vent Cove Base For all sprung floor systems, dance, aerobic, gymnasium and sports floor installations. This heavy duty molded rubber with a unique vented design provides years of proven performance with a minimum of maintenance. Each section is 4′ feet long, 4″ inches high. Its wide 3″ inch toe covers expansion voids and vents permit air circulation for suspended floors. Available in black or brown. Flush wall fit, smooth non-skid surface. Molded outside vent cove corners available also.

STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
M-900-Black Vent Cove Base
4′(L) x 4″(H) x 3″(toe)
$45.95 ea.
$11.49 linear foot
$43.76 ea.
$10.94 linear foot
M-901-Brown Vent Cove Base
4′(L) x 4″(H) x 3″(toe)
$45.95 ea.
$11.49 linear foot
$43.76 ea.
$10.94 linear foot

 

STYLE # DESCRIPTION RETAIL PRICE DISCOUNT PRICE
CO-910-Black Outside Corner
4″(H) x 3″(toe)
$24.50 ea. $22.94 ea.
CO-911-Brown Outside Corner
4″(H) x 3″(toe)
$24.50 ea. $22.94 ea.

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